Apr 17, 2014
I love’m plants

I love’m plants

(Source: whoisjamiejones)

Apr 17, 2014

Crazy in love with my robe de cocktail fushia

A pleasant cocktail dress is one that you can wear out to a dinner date or to a semi formal event, but wherever you use it, it has to look good on your body. Cocktail dresses come in many styles and it is imperative that you find the one that best fits your shape. A cocktail dress that fits well creates an hourglass silhouette on your body and assists to evenly balance out your body’s proportions.

You will find five fundamental body shapes and you need to consider yours when picking out a cocktail dress.

An hour glass silhouette gives the semblance of balance between your hips and also your bust, using a waistline which looks as though it has been taken in to give shape for your body. Regardless of the form of the human body, a dress that suits it well and enables you to seem amazing will cause you to feel as good as you seem.

Apple Shaped - Women with an apple shaped body have less defined waistlines and they could have slightly more weight around their middles. Many women with this shape also have a fuller chest. The dress you select should give your body a streamlined look, so you must avoid dresses that are loose fitting or seem to haven’t any shape.

Pear Shaped - A woman that has a bigger chest and smaller hips has a pear shaped body. You must look into a robe de cocktail fushia that draws the eye away from your hips and towards your absolute best asset, your upper body. A halter neckline or strapless dress operates well for women with this body type.

Athletic - Slender, athletic body shapes don’t have curves to hide as they seem to be straight up and down The dress you select should give you the illusion of curves by utilizing an empire waist, ruffles at the top or a peplum dress operates well too.

Upside Down Triangle - This shape features broader shoulders or a more substantial bust and smaller hips. You desire the eye to be brought to your waist or hips, maybe not your upper body. Dresses with v-necks, love necklines or spaghetti straps operate very well along with your body shape.

Apr 17, 2014
Lovely secrets…

Lovely secrets…

(Source: brunomax-photography)

Apr 8, 2014

(Source: mainstreetinternet)

Apr 8, 2014
rhamphotheca:

Dingoes Aren’t Just Wild Dogs
Rather than being the descendants of feral mutts, dingoes are actually in their own unique taxonomical corner
by Rachel Nuwer
Dingoes might look like your run-of-the-mill mongrel pooch, and for years, researchers assumed the dingo’s ancestors were domesticated dogs from East Asia that subsequently went wild. But it turns out that dingoes are more unique than that. They are not only a distinct species, but also a distinct group of predators, separate from dogs and wolves, The Scientist reports.
Dingoes arrived in Australia several thousands years ago, and they were first mentioned as a species in 1793. At that time, they were called Canis dingo. However, their official name was soon changed to Canis lupus dingo, on the assumption that dingoes were, in fact, a subspecies of wolf and within the same evolutionary clade as domestic dogs.
In a new study, researchers challenged that assumption. They examined 69 dingo skulls that dated back to 1900 or earlier—presumably before dingoes would have encountered and interbred with domesticated dogs, which only arrived in Australia when Europeans did. Dingoes, the researchers found, have anatomical features that set them apart from dogs and wolves, including a wider head and longer snout, The Scientist writes. The team also found that dingoes don’t necessarily have to be tan-colored; they can be black, white or dark brown, too…
(read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/dingoes-arent-just-wild-dogs-180950384/?utm_source=facebook.com&no-ist)
photo: PartnerHund

rhamphotheca:

Dingoes Aren’t Just Wild Dogs

Rather than being the descendants of feral mutts, dingoes are actually in their own unique taxonomical corner

by Rachel Nuwer

Dingoes might look like your run-of-the-mill mongrel pooch, and for years, researchers assumed the dingo’s ancestors were domesticated dogs from East Asia that subsequently went wild. But it turns out that dingoes are more unique than that. They are not only a distinct species, but also a distinct group of predators, separate from dogs and wolves, The Scientist reports.

Dingoes arrived in Australia several thousands years ago, and they were first mentioned as a species in 1793. At that time, they were called Canis dingo. However, their official name was soon changed to Canis lupus dingo, on the assumption that dingoes were, in fact, a subspecies of wolf and within the same evolutionary clade as domestic dogs.

In a new study, researchers challenged that assumption. They examined 69 dingo skulls that dated back to 1900 or earlier—presumably before dingoes would have encountered and interbred with domesticated dogs, which only arrived in Australia when Europeans did. Dingoes, the researchers found, have anatomical features that set them apart from dogs and wolves, including a wider head and longer snout, The Scientist writes. The team also found that dingoes don’t necessarily have to be tan-colored; they can be black, white or dark brown, too…

(read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/dingoes-arent-just-wild-dogs-180950384/?utm_source=facebook.com&no-ist)

photo: PartnerHund

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